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Adrian Roselli
Crypto Adversarial Model CLI

All Posts Tagged: whatwg

AD Support in HTML Video

This post supplements Browser Video Players Review. There I wade into the de facto accessibility of the <video> element based on the default video players provided by browsers. The results of my testing here update the tables in that post. One of the primary challenges of using the browsers’ default…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, css, html, mobile, standards, usability, W3C, whatwg

Media Queries in HTML Video

Before you get too far into this post, maybe read Browser Video Players Review. There I wade into the accessibility of the <video> element based on the video players browsers provide. Then maybe read Scott Jehl’s How to Use Responsive HTML Video (…and Audio!). I am leaning on support in…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, css, html, mobile, standards, usability, W3C, whatwg

Splitting within Selects

The native HTML <select> is renowned for its styling limitations. Even with control over the closed state and trigger appearance, the options themselves are still defined primarily by the browser and the OS. While I think this is generally fine (preferred, even), the <selectlist> (nee <selectmenu>) hopes to change that.…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, Chrome, Firefox, html, Safari, standards, usability, whatwg

Browser Video Players Review

The Test Page The Code Testing Results Keyboard Screen Readers Voice Control, Forced Colors, Speed Media Queries: 20 December 2023 Audio Description: 20 December 2023 Wrap-up Browsers each provide built-in video players for the <video> element. Nearly four years ago Scott Vinkle wrote How accessible is the HTML video player?,…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, Chrome, Firefox, html, mobile, Safari, standards, W3C, whatwg

Blockquotes in Screen Readers

TL;DR: This post does not assert the correct way to code blockquotes, it will only demonstrate how screen readers announce some existing patterns. Test Details The first four examples are lifted from WHATWG HTML’s <blockquote> entry. The next three are from W3C HTML’s 2019 <blockquote> guidance (the W3C HTML spec…

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Tags: accessibility, html, standards, usability, W3C, whatwg

Source Order Viewer in Canary

Don’t tell anyone. This may be a secret. But I am really excited, as no person should ever be over something this mundane. Check this out (and then read on for what is happening here): The alt text gives it away, but look in the lower right corner. In the…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, Chrome, Edge, whatwg

Stepping Back from the Edge

Due to lack of overwhelming request, you can download this logo (SVG). By now it is old news, in Internet time, that Microsoft Edge will replace its rendering engine with Chromium. Nearly six years ago I wrote about Opera dumping Presto to move to Chromium. The landscape is slightly different…

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Tags: browser, Chrome, Edge, Firefox, Microsoft, standards, W3C, whatwg

Slides from role=drinks at CSUN

Note: Below are the animated images and video that were in my slides but which did not survive in the transition to SlideShare. They are all quite large and will take time to load. If you want to save on your data plan, hit the browser’s stop button now. If…

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Tags: accessibility, html, slides, speaking, standards, W3C, whatwg

Slides from Accessibility Camp Toronto 2016: Mind Your lang

The slides from my talk at Accessibility Camp Toronto, Mind Your lang. Note: Below are the animated images and video that were in my slides but which did not survive in the transition to SlideShare. They are all quite large and will take time to load. If you want to…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, css, html, slides, speaking, standards, usability, UX, WCAG, whatwg

Use Only One <main> on a Page

That’s it. That’s the meat of the post. The title covers it all. You don’t need to read any further. You are, of course, welcome to continue since I spent all this time writing it. Definition For those who aren’t familiar with <main>, the element is intended to be a…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, html, usability, UX, W3C, WAI, whatwg

On Use of the Lang Attribute

Way back in October I noticed this WHATWG HTML bug (26942) where someone asked why do these examples of <html> lack the lang attribute? I thought the answer from Hixie was a bit dismissive and not based on any data or real-world benefits of use, particularly in the context of…

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Tags: accessibility, globalization, html, internationalization, localization, standards, W3C, WCAG, whatwg, xhtml

The HTML Star Is Ignored (and Shouldn’t Be)

On Friday Jeff Croft posted a piece titled Web Standards Killed the HTML Star where he makes the argument that just knowing HTML and CSS is no longer enough to get a job. He states that the web standards movement has effectively rendered the need for specialized knowledge of browser…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, css, html, rant, standards, W3C, whatwg