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Adrian Roselli
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All Posts Tagged: whatwg

Are Patents Killing HTML5 Video?

You may recall from my post in February, WebM, H.264 Debate Still Going, that the H.264 video codec is considered patent-encumbered (which resulted in its dismissal from the HTML5 specification) and Google has argued that its own WebM / VP8 codec is made up of patents it owns, releasing it…

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Tags: Google, html, patents, rant, standards, video, W3C, whatwg

Don’t Let HTML5 Become the New DHTML

This photo represents some of the technologies (pint glasses) that HTML5 (t-shirt) is thought to encompass (drink). The horror of that concept is represented by the hands (defensive wounds coming).I had the pleasure of sharing some pints with Bruce Lawson and Chris Mills last week in London. While discussing what…

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Tags: css, Flash, fonts, html, JavaScript, mobile, rant, RSS, standards, SVG, video, W3C, whatwg, WOFF

CSS 2.1 is Finally Final

It’s only been 13 years, but CSS version 2.1 is now officially a W3C Recommendation — essentially meaning the specification is final. Which of course means you are now all free to use it in your web pages. CSS2 became a W3C Recommendation on May 12, 1998, over 13 years…

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Tags: css, html, standards, W3C, whatwg

More on Image alt Requirement in HTML5

Nearly two weeks ago I wrote up a post outlining the W3C decision to no longer require the alt attribute on images in HTML5: Image alt Attributes Not Always Required in HTML5. I was genuinely surprised to see that was the most popular post on this blog and garnered the…

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Tags: accessibility, html, standards, W3C, WCAG, whatwg

Image alt Attributes Not Always Required in HTML5

It has long been accepted that the alt attribute of the <img> element, while not a perfect method to provide a text alternative to an image, is still a necessary attribute to provide at least some level of access to the image content for users who cannot see the image…

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Tags: accessibility, html, standards, W3C, WCAG, whatwg

More on the HTML5 Logo

There is so much buzz now and in the past week that it’s hard to pick out only a few items to address. I still have an opinion on just about everything going on with the spec, W3C, WHATWG, additional specs, the “pundits,” and many other things that could lead…

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Tags: css, html, rant, standards, W3C, whatwg

W3C Clarifies HTML5 Logo Is for HTML Only

The W3C has rolled back its definition of what the new HTML5 logo represents: This logo represents HTML5, the cornerstone for modern Web applications. In case that isn’t clear, which it might not be, the FAQ gets far more specific on the inclusion of CSS3 in the logo definition (emphasis…

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Tags: css, html, rant, standards, W3C, whatwg

HTML5 Finally Gets… a Logo?

Start Rant With all the debate about elements, attributes, semantic meaning and who really owns HTML5, it’s thrilling to see that the W3C has risen above all the chaos to release something which should truly unify HTML5 and foster its widespread adoption (as soon as it is finished) across the…

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Tags: css, html, rant, standards, W3C, whatwg

W3C and WHATWG Provide HTML5 Updates

W3C The W3C is pretty good about posting news when new HTML/CSS-related documents undergo updates, status changes, or generally move forward. On Friday the W3C HTML Working Group announced the publication of eight new documents. The brief release provides an even briefer overview of each, or you can see the…

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Tags: accessibility, html, standards, video, W3C, whatwg, xhtml

H.264 Getting Dropped from Chrome

If you pay any attention to the plodding chaos that is the development of HTML5, then you’ve probably seen the discussions around the video element and how best to encode videos. Over a year and half ago Ian Hickson gutted the video and audio portions of the HTML5 specification to…

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Tags: browser, Chrome, Google, html, standards, video, whatwg, YouTube

Year-End Cliché

I can’t turn on the TV, surf the web, or peer into my Twitter feed without stumbling into another year-end wrap-up of 2010. These dime-a-dozen contrivances abound like the proverbial lemming to the cliff (lemmings don’t really do that, it’s also a contrivance). However, there have been enough of some…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, html, internet, mobile, social media, standards, usability, UX, W3C, WAI, WCAG, whatwg

Google’s Web Book May Not Help Those Who Need It Most

In an effort to help educate the general public about its browser, Chrome, and the web in general, Google released an online “book” called 20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web. Done in the style of an illustrated children’s book that allows readers to flip through the pages,…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, Chrome, css, Google, html, internet, Internet Explorer, rant, standards, W3C, whatwg