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All Posts Tagged: UX

So You Think You’ve Built a Good Infinite Scroll

So you’re saying there’s a chance … that I’ll make it to the footer. Last week Derek Featherstone posted Automatic infinite scrolling and accessibility, a quick rundown of why having your page just keep going without user input to do so can be such a hassle for users. Also, don’t…

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Tags: accessibility, JavaScript, rant, usability, UX

HTML5 Developer Conference Slides: Selfish Accessibility

Today I had the pleasure of speaking at the HTML5 Developer Conference in lovely San Francisco. I presented on accessibility and how it relates to you as a current and future user with my presentation Selfish Accessibility. The full abstract: We can all pretend that we’re helping others by making…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, browser, html, slides, speaking, standards, usability, UX, W3C, WAI, WCAG

On Hiding URLs in the Browser

This image is stolen directly from Allen Pike’s post because I don’t have time yet to make a proper one. It shows the same page URL as seen in the address bars of Firefox 29 and Chrome Canary 36.0.1951. Two days ago news broke that Chrome was going to modify…

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Tags: browser, Chrome, rant, usability, UX

Make Getty Embeds Responsive

In my post What to Consider before Using Free Getty Images one of the many caveats I outlined was the lack of responsive support in Getty’s iframe code. Of all the issues I raised, this one is actually pretty easy to get around. Background While the other points still preclude…

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Tags: css, html, JavaScript, mobile, pattern, usability, UX

I Don’t Care What Google Did, Just Keep Underlining Links

Screen shots of Google search results showing protanopia (middle) and deuteranopia (right) forms of color-blindness. Click/tap/select the image for a full-size view. I figured I’d lead with my argument right in the title. Even if you read no further, you know where I stand. I’m just going to fill up…

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Tags: accessibility, css, Google, html, rant, usability, UX

What to Consider before Using Free Getty Images

There was quite a lot of chatter this week over Getty’s move to make its image library (ok, only 40 million of its images) free for non-commercial use on the web. Some might think they can now just start taking images from the Getty site, but not quite. Getty requires…

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Tags: accessibility, css, design, html, UX

On Screen Reader Detection

Background The latest WebAIM screen reader survey results came out last week, and I had been looking forward to the results of the questions related to screen reader detection. I can say I was a bit surprised by both. To make it easy, I’ll reprint the questions and answers here.…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, standards, usability, UX

Network Solutions Is Most Likely Not Phishing

You may have read my rant earlier this week about Network Solutions trying to trick me into allowing them to send me spam. As part of that dark pattern, Network Solutions asks me to verify my contact information, and then tries to up-sell me, and then suggests that I need…

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Tags: design, NetSol, rant, usability, UX

Network Solutions and Yet More Dark Patterns

In late 2012 I related my extreme displeasure of trying to register a domain through the intentionally confusing Network Solutions ecommerce flow. In my post, Network Solutions and Dark Patterns, I used a whole lot of screen captures to show the convoluted flow that I believe Network Solutions uses to…

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Tags: design, NetSol, rant, usability, UX

Comparing Opera Mini and Chrome Compression

Depending on how much you spend staying up on web browsers, you’ve probably heard the cry of Opera did it first more than once (though the low-hanging fruit, browser tabs, wasn’t technically Opera first). When Google announced that Chrome would offer a data compression mode, you may have figured you’d…

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Tags: browser, Chrome, mobile, Opera, usability, UX

“Tracking Printed Pages (or How to Validate Assumptions)” at Web Standards Sherpa

Today my second article at Web Standards Sherpa has been posted, Tracking Printed Pages (or How to Validate Assumptions). I fit a lot in there, but the gist is that I show you how to track when and what pages from a site are printed so you can make a…

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Tags: analytics, clients, css, design, html, print, standards, usability, UX

Web Development Advent Calendars for 2013

Ganesha may or may not be stealing chocolate from the advent calendar. For a few years now web developers around the world have celebrated Saturnalia Christmas with advent calendars covering topics related to the web. Some come and go, but you’ll probably recognize a few regulars on this list. I…

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Tags: accessibility, css, design, fonts, html, internet, mobile, standards, usability, UX