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All Posts Tagged: standards

Sortable Table Column Mad Libs

Visually and functionally sortable column headers on tables are straightforward (I have a post coming on that soon). However, making them accessible can be a bit frustrating. To clarify, making them accessible to screen readers is frustrating. There are two critical areas where screen readers fall down here: lack of…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, html, pattern, standards, tables, usability, UX

Be Wary of doc-subtitle

In early March, Steve Faulkner shared this nugget for making sub-headings: 👉If you want to semantically identify a heading subtitle, look no further than role="doc-subtitle" w3.org/TR/dpub-aria-1.0/#doc-subtitle #HTML #ARIA #WebDev pic.twitter.com/uaHcVRp6oz Steve Faulkner (@stevefaulkner) March 7, 2020 On its surface it looks pretty handy. Handy enough that Chris Ferdinandi wrote about…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, browser, html, pattern, rant, standards

What’s New in WCAG 2.2

The latest (and probably last) WCAG version 2 point release is in draft and the W3C is asking for comments and feedback by 18 September 2020 either via GitHub or via email. The new success criteria address cognitive and learning disabilities, mobile devices, and ebooks. Read more details in the…

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Tags: accessibility, standards, W3C, WAI, WCAG

ARIA Grid As an Anti-Pattern

First I will cover what an ARIA grid is per the ARIA specification, and then I will discuss two patterns proposed by the ARIA Authoring Practices. ARIA 1.1 Data Grids Layout Grids As Defined The Provided Examples 1. Simple List of Links 2. Pill List For a List of Message…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, ARIAbuse, rant, standards, UX

#accessiBe Will Get You Sued

Disclaimer: This post and the headline is my opinion. I provide facts throughout to inform that opinion. I say this because accessiBe managed to get $12 million in funding from K1 Capital and I am guessing some of that money will be allocated to attorney fees. I am also not…

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Tags: accessibility, rant, standards, UX

Disclosure Widgets

A disclosure widget is a simple control whose sole purpose is to hide or show stuff. Native HTML has one built in via the <details> and <summary> elements. Until recently, if you wanted to use it in modern browsers you needed to use a polyfill. In most cases it was…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, html, standards

Avoid aria-roledescription

HTML has all sorts of built-in features that, when used correctly, are accessible, will localize, and which just work. For example, if I want a button, I use <button>, and a screen reader will announce it as button. For users in other languages, they will hear whatever is their word…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, ARIAbuse, browser, rant, standards, UX

CSUN 2020: CSS Display Properties versus HTML Semantics

While originally I was scheduled to attend CSUN to present two talks one talk, I ended up not attending (my father won A Major Award so I joined him instead). I gave my talk remotely in my scheduled slot (during my father’s award dinner). While I would have loved to…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, css, html, slides, standards

Stop Using ‘Drop-down’

TL;DR: Stop using the word drop-down. Instead choose a term that accurately describes the control you want. I have worked both with native platform developers and web developers. While control names might differ, if a control was functionally the same then it was not an issue. A TextBox, for example,…

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Tags: html, pattern, standards

Web Development Advent Calendars for 2019

Web developers around the world have celebrated Saturnalia solstice Isaac Newton’s birthday Christmas with advent calendars covering web-related topics. As a result, you may recognize some of the ones listed below. Every year I miss a few on day one, so add a comment or tweet me if you have…

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Tags: accessibility, css, design, html, internet, standards, UX

CSS Logical Properties

I have often remarked that my blog is little more than a place for me to offload my memory. I need not remember the syntax, logic, test results, etc. of every control, widget, style, browser, and so on. I can just write a post and refer to it later. This…

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Tags: browser, css, design, i18n, L10n, standards

Stop Giving Control Hints to Screen Readers

TL;DR: for standard HTML controls and standard ARIA patterns (widgets), you do not need to add instructions for screen readers on how to use them nor what they are. When a screen reader encounters an element on the page that invites interaction beyond reading, it typically provides users with instructions…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, ARIAbuse, browser, html, standards, WCAG