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All Posts Tagged: browser

a11yTO Conf: CSS Display Properties versus HTML Semantics

If you attended my pre-recorded remote CSUN 2020 talk, then this talk will be familiar. I updated with the latest browsers, since February was six Chrome and nine Firefox versions ago. This talk was also only fifteen minutes, so I cut the videos and some other materials. Go check the…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, css, html, slides

Alternative Text for CSS Generated Content

Relying on images that come from CSS has always been risky from an accessibility perspective. CSS background images, in particular, must either be purely decorative or be described to the user in some way. The risk is no different for images coming from CSS generated content using content: url(foo.gif) (typically…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, css, standards, usability, UX

Dialog Focus in Screen Readers

Creating an accessible dialog on the web is trickier than it should be. Lack of support for the <dialog> element, the need for fundraisers to get inert into WebKit, inconsistent support for the ARIA dialog role, and other annoyances make them problematic. Scott O’Hara has spent a few years covering…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, html, usability, UX

VoiceOver on iOS 14 Supports Description Lists

The <dl> has existed since HTML+, or 1993, when it was called definition list. VoiceOver on iOS has existed since 2009, when it was introduced with the iPhone 3GS. Neither VoiceOver on iOS nor iPadOS had support for this core feature of HTML that was in existence for 16 years…

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Tags: Apple, browser, html, Safari, standards

Source Order Viewer in Edge 86

Update, 15 September 2020: Microsoft put together a more formal announcement at Introducing Source Order Viewer in the Microsoft Edge DevTools. It has some video examples and instructions to enable it. Edge 86 has introduced a feature that shows the source order of a page. You can read more about…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, css, Edge

Be Wary of doc-subtitle

In early March, Steve Faulkner shared this nugget for making sub-headings: 👉If you want to semantically identify a heading subtitle, look no further than role="doc-subtitle" w3.org/TR/dpub-aria-1.0/#doc-subtitle #HTML #ARIA #WebDev pic.twitter.com/uaHcVRp6oz Steve Faulkner (@stevefaulkner) March 7, 2020 On its surface it looks pretty handy. Handy enough that Chris Ferdinandi wrote about…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, browser, html, pattern, rant, standards

Avoid aria-roledescription

HTML has all sorts of built-in features that, when used correctly, are accessible, will localize, and which just work. For example, if I want a button, I use <button>, and a screen reader will announce it as button. For users in other languages, they will hear whatever is their word…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, ARIAbuse, browser, rant, standards, UX

CSS Logical Properties

I have often remarked that my blog is little more than a place for me to offload my memory. I need not remember the syntax, logic, test results, etc. of every control, widget, style, browser, and so on. I can just write a post and refer to it later. This…

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Tags: browser, css, design, i18n, L10n, standards

Stop Giving Control Hints to Screen Readers

TL;DR: for standard HTML controls and standard ARIA patterns (widgets), you do not need to add instructions for screen readers on how to use them nor what they are. When a screen reader encounters an element on the page that invites interaction beyond reading, it typically provides users with instructions…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, ARIAbuse, browser, html, standards, WCAG

Smashing / Web We Want Video Pitch

At Smashing Conference in New York on Tuesday, October 15, Microsoft is hosting a lunch session as part of its The Web We Want initiative. Developers are pitching their wants. I was invited to pitch my request, but since I will not be at the conference I was asked for…

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Tags: accessibility, browser, slides, standards, WAI, WCAG

evolt.org Browser Archive 20 Years Old

The Browser Archive home page as captured on 13 October 1999. On August 18, 1999, we at evolt.org launched the Browser Archive. At launch browsers.evolt.org contained 80 different browsers. It started with my personal testing suite built up from 1996, and just kind of went from there. Those links point…

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Tags: browser, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Netscape, Opera

Maybe Ignore type=search

Another case of the headline saying it all. If you have a valid, accessible search field (with a useful, sensible label) then you can probably ignore type=”search” and use type=”text” instead. I made a code sample you can use for testing in your preferred set-up; it is what I used…

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Tags: accessibility, ARIA, browser, html, standards, usability, UX